Category Archives: awards

Emmy Love

The Emmy nominations are in, and oddly enough, NO ONE seems to be talking about them. So I thought I’d give my thoughts to the only categories anyone really cares about.

Outstanding Drama
“Breaking Bad”
“Dexter”
“The Good Wife”
“Lost”
“Mad Men”
“True Blood”

I don’t watch The Good Wife, so there’s not much I can say about it. I’ve heard some good things, and from what I understand, the fact that the show and Julianna Margulies were nominated isn’t too big a surprise. Breaking Bad and Mad Men earning nominations also lands firmly in the “no big surprise” category, as both shows put out some of their best work this past season. Dexter seems to be a show we should expect to see in this category, although — with the exception of John Lythgoe’s performance in the show’s fourth season — Dexter seems to be a series offering diminishing returns with each season. With the [spoiler alert!] death of Rita at the end of last season, the show has a chance to seriously shake itself up. We’ll see whether or not they’re able to pull it off. Lost has been nominated in this category a couple of times before, but I have a feeling this time around its inclusion has more to do with the show going away FOREVER. Don’t get me wrong, I was satisfied with the way the show wrapped things up in its final season, but taken as a whole, season 6 wasn’t nearly as strong as seasons past. Rounding out this group is True Blood, which I’ve only seen a few episodes of. The fact that it was able to make its way into the drama category is a little amazing to me, given Anna Paquin’s horrible southern accent.

Outstanding Comedy
“30 Rock”
“Curb Your Enthusiasm”
“Glee”
“Modern Family”
“Nurse Jackie”
“The Office”

30 Rock and The Office are a couple of moldy oldies when it comes to Emmy noms, but I don’t think neither one of them is going to take the award away this year. 30 Rock suffered a pretty big dip in quality when stacked against past seasons, and The Office was just horrible. I don’t care if Jim and Pam finally got married and had a kid. The show sucked. Seriously, I don’t understand how The Office was nominated and Parks and Recreation got passed over. I have yet to be disappointed by Curb Your Enthusiasm, and look forward to the show’s eighth season with great relish, but I don’t really think it has any chance of winning. That honor will probably go to Modern Family, which had an incredible first season. Now, I say that Modern Family will win, but of course the country’s strange fascination with Glee will come around to bite it in the ass. With 19 nominations, I’m worried. And you should be, too.

Outstanding Actor in a Drama
Bryan Cranston (“Breaking Bad”)
Hugh Laurie (“House M.D.”)
Jon Hamm (“Mad Men”)
Kyle Chandler (“Friday Night Lights”)
Matthew Fox (“Lost”)
Michael C. Hall (“Dexter”)

Nice to see Matthew Fox, but again, I think his best work on the show came in previous seasons. I count Michael C. Hall and Jon Hamm out. They’re both great actors, BUT Bryan Cranston’s also been nominated, and has won in this category two years running now. And as much as I love Mad Men, Breaking Bad is just doing more for me right now. That aside, what I’m really happy about in this category is Kyle Chandler’s nomination. It’s a long shot, but his work on Friday Night Lights these past four years has been phenomenal and it’s a shame that it’s taken so long for him to be recognized here.

Outstanding Actress in a Drama
Connie Britton (“Friday Night Lights”)
Glenn Close (“Damages”)
January Jones (“Mad Men”)
Julianna Margulies (“The Good Wife”)
Mariska Hargitay (“Law & Order: Special Victims Unit”)
Kyra Sedgwick (“The Closer”)

Again, Friday Night Lights. I could easily see Connie Britton winning this category, but that may be my utter lack of interest in L&O, Damages and The Closer speaking. Realistically speaking, Julianna Margulies has a real chance here.

Outstanding Actor in a Comedy
Alec Baldwin (“30 Rock”)
Jim Parsons (“The Big Bang Theory”)
Larry David (“Curb Your Enthusiasm”)
Matthew Morrison (“Glee”)
Steve Carell (“The Office”)
Tony Shalhoub (“Monk”)

I don’t see how Alec Baldwin doesn’t get this one. Although seeing as how Monk is going away, Tony Shalhoub’s also got a shot. I’d love to see a Larry David win, but it probably isn’t in the cards. Again, for shame Steve Carell, for shame.

Outstanding Actress in a Comedy
Amy Poehler (“Parks and Recreation”)
Edie Falco (“Nurse Jackie”)
Julia Louis-Dreyfus (“The New Adventures of Old Christine”)
Lea Michele (“Glee”)
Tina Fey (“30 Rock”)
Toni Collette (“The United States of Tara”)

I’m glad to see Parks and Recreation wasn’t completely passed over. Although I’m not sure Amy Poehler can defeat Tina Fey’s star power. From what I understand, Edie Falco is the least comedic thing about Nurse Jackie, so I wouldn’t put much stock in her this year. From the rest of the pack, Lea Michele is the only one I can see winning, in one of those bonehead stunts the Academy likes to pull, like when James Spader beat out James Gandolfini a few years back. No, James Spader. You are not a better actor than James Gandolfini.

Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama
Aaron Paul (“Breaking Bad”)
Andre Braugher (“Men of a Certain Age”)
John Slattery (“Mad Men”)
Martin Short (“Damages”)
Michael Emerson (“Lost”)
Terry O’Quinn (“Lost”)

Just a few thoughts on these supporting categories. I love John Slattery, Terry O’Quinn and Michael Emerson, but none of them did what Aaron Paul did this past year on Breaking Bad. If he doesn’t walk away with the award this year, it’ll be a travesty. Congrats to Andre Braugher for sneaking in under the radar here.

Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama
Archie Panjabi (“The Good Wife”)
Christine Baranski (“The Good Wife”)
Christina Hendricks (“Mad Men”)
Elisabeth Moss (“Mad Men”)
Rose Byrne (“Damages”)
Sharon Gless (“Burn Notice”)

I used to date Christina Hendricks, so I’m partial to her in this category, and thought she showed more range than Elizabeth Moss in this season of Mad Men. Again, I don’t watch The Good Wife (or Damages for that matter), and as of yet, no one’s offered to pay me to watch Burn Notice.

Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy
Chris Colfer (“Glee”)
Eric Stonestreet (“Modern Family”)
Jesse Tyler Ferguson (“Modern Family”)
Jon Cryer (“Two and a Half Men”)
Neil Patrick Harris (“How I Met Your Mother”)
Ty Burrell (“Modern Family”)

This one’s pretty crowded, but I would put my money on either Eric Stonestreet or Ty Burrell. I’m just desperately hoping that Glee doesn’t come in and sweep the whole thing.

Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy
Holland Taylor (“Two and a Half Men”)
Jane Krakowski (“30 Rock”)
Jane Lynch (“Glee”)
Julie Bowen (“Modern Family”)
Kristen Wiig (“Saturday Night Live”)
Sofia Vergara (“Modern Family”)

My heart says Kristen Wiig, but this one is probably going to go to Jane Lynch. She’s obviously a great comedian, and her character on Glee is pretty funny. Congrats to both Julie Bowen and Sofia Vergara for their nominations, although now that I think about it, this is one that I can’t really see Julie Bowen winning.

Other thoughts…

  • Suck it, Charlie Sheen.
  • Suck it, Entourage.
  • Really surprised to see Ed O’Neill snubbed this year.
  • Not surprised to see Sons of Anarchy snubbed.
  • I’m not the biggest Community fan out there, but not a single nomination? Come on, now.
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And the winner is?

Anyone else leave the Oscars feeling a little underwhelmed this year? Like every year, there were things I liked and things I didn’t, but overall it was hard to not look back at Jon Stewart or even Hugh Jackman and think about what could have been. You’d think that having Alec Baldwin and Steve Martin co-host would be a sure thing. Instead it felt like all we got was a reheated stand-up routine, the underlying theme of which was Meryl Streep’s a fantastic actress, but man, what a bitch.

This trend continued with many of the award presenters themselves. Penelope Cruz made a few mumbled remarks about how difficult it was to understand anything that came out of her mouth. I only know this because a Spanish friend of mine was there to translate. Finally, things looked like they were brightening up when Robert Downey Jr. and Tina Fey came out to present the award for original screenplay. Their bit had me spitting Dr. Pepper all over my sister’s brand new LED TV (it’s done). I kept hoping Tina Fey would say that everything up until that point had been a joke and they were the real hosts of the show, then Robert Downey Jr. would put the Iron Man suit on. I seriously think he’d fake his own death if he thought he could live out the rest of his life as Tony Stark.

As for the winners, I can’t say that I have any major complaints. I thought it was a good move on the Academy’s part to widen the pool of best picture contenders to ten. But still, did anyone besides Avatar and The Hurt Locker ever have a real chance? Probably not. And I liked Avatar as much as the next guy, but thought The Hurt Locker was more important and deserved to win. Plus, it’s funny to think of how all those message board guys who were depressed that Pandora wasn’t a real place are taking this. They’re probably hating life right now. If I had to complain about something, it would be that Inglourious Basterds didn’t do better than it did. That film may be the best Tarantino’s ever done and I thought it deserved more recognition.

The only other major highlight of the show was the tribute to John Hughes. I swear, would there have been any movies made in the 80s if he hadn’t of been around? In the end, there were surprises and not surprises, and James Cameron still got away with most of our money. It’s okay, though. It was only half a billion dollars.

Anyway, here’s a list of the winners…

[Best Picture]
“Avatar”
“The Blind Side”
“District 9”
“An Education”
“The Hurt Locker”
“Inglourious Basterds”
“Precious”
“A Serious Man”
“Up”
“Up in the Air”

[Best Director]
Kathryn Bigelow, “The Hurt Locker”

James Cameron, “Avatar”
Lee Daniels, “Precious”
Jason Reitman, “Up in the Air”
Quentin Tarantino, “Inglourious Basterds”

[Best Actor]
Jeff Bridges, “Crazy Heart”
George Clooney, “Up in the Air”
Colin Firth, “A Single Man”
Morgan Freeman, “Invictus”
Jeremy Renner, “The Hurt Locker”

[Best Actress]
Sandra Bullock, “The Blind Side”
Helen Mirren, “The Last Station”
Carey Mulligan, “An Education”
Gabourey Sidibe, “Precious”
Meryl Streep, “Julie & Julia”

[Best Supporting Actor]
Matt Damon, “Invictus”
Woody Harrelson, “The Messenger”
Christopher Plummer, “The Last Station”
Stanley Tucci, “The Lovely Bones”
Christoph Waltz, “Inglourious Basterds”

[Best Supporting Actress]
Penelope Cruz, “Nine”
Maggie Gyllenhaal, “Crazy Heart”
Vera Farmiga, “Up in the Air”
Anna Kendrick, “Up in the Air”
Mo’Nique, “Precious: Based on the Novel ‘Push’ by Sapphire”

[Original Screenplay]
“Inglourious Basterds”
“The Hurt Locker”
“The Messenger”
“A Serious Man”
“Up”

[Adapted Screenplay]
“District 9”
“An Education”
“In the Loop”
“Precious”
“Up in the Air”

[Best Animated Feature]
“Coraline”
“Fantastic Mr. Fox”
“The Princess and the Frog”
“The Secret of Kells”
“Up”

[Best Foreign Language Film]
“Ajami” (Israel)
“El Secreto de Sus Ojos” (Argentina)
“The Milk of Sorrow” (Peru)
“Un Prophete” (France)
“The White Ribbon” (Germany)

[Art Direction]
“Avatar”

“The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus”
“Nine”
“Sherlock Holmes”
“The Young Victoria”

[Cinematography]
“Avatar”

“Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince”
“The Hurt Locker”
“Inglourious Basterds”
“The White Ribbon”

[Costume Design]
“Bright Star”
“Coco Before Chanel”
“The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus”
“Nine”
“The Young Victoria”

[Documentary (Feature)]
“Burma VJ”
“The Cove”
“Food, Inc.”
“The Most Dangerous Man in America: Daniel Ellsberg and the Pentagon Papers”
“Which Way Home”

[Documentary (Short Subject)]
“China’s Unnatural Disaster: The Tears of Sichuan Province”
“The Last Campaign of Governor Booth Gardner”
“The Last Truck: Closing of a GM Plant”
“Music by Prudence”
“Rabbit a la Berlin”

[Film Editing]
“Avatar”
“District 9”
“The Hurt Locker”
“Inglourious Basterds”
“Precious: based on the Novel ‘Push’ by Sapphire”

[Makeup]
“Il Divo”
“Star Trek”
“The Young Victoria”

[Music (Original Score)]
“Avatar”
“Fantastic Mr. Fox”
“The Hurt Locker”
“Sherlock Holmes”
“Up”

[Music (Original Song)]
“Almost There” from “The Princess and the Frog”
“Down in New Orleans” from “The Princess and the Frog”
“Loin de Paname” from “Paris 36”
“Take It All” from “Nine”
“The Weary Kind” from “Crazy Heart

[Short Film (Animated)]
“French Roast”
“Granny O’Grimm’s Sleeping Beauty”
“The Lady and the Reaper”
“Logorama”
“A Matter of Loaf and Death”

[Short Film (Live Action)]
“The Door”
“Instead of Abracadabra”
“Kavi”
“Miracle Fish”
“The New Tenants”

[Sound Editing]
“Avatar”
“The Hurt Locker”
“Inglourious Basterds”
“Star Trek”
“Up”

[Sound Mixing]
“Avatar”
“The Hurt Locker”
“Inglourious Basterds”
“Star Trek”
“Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen”

[Visual Effects]
“Avatar”
“District 9”
“Star Trek”